David Hockney

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David Hockney

David Hockney is one of the most prolific contemporary artists exploring the world of figurative art and has done so throughout his career, beginning in 1955 with “Portrait of my Father”. Studies of ordinary people and celebritie figures such as Andy Warhol give almost a diary and insight hislife. His style of paintings has developed and changed through his lifetime, with naturalistic portraits in the 60’s, developing into cubist influenced work through the 1980’s, and then more recently his photomontage work and iPad paintings and studies show how he is always reflecting his work with modern times, taking advantage of technological advances and social aspects to further his work.
Hockney uses a strong sense of colour within his more recent portraits (as shown above). The variation in colour of tones, and almost ‘scratching’ brush-strokes really drew my attention to the series of portraits. His expressionistic use of mark-making applies small brush strokes and lines to almost sculpt a 3-dimensional look to the facial features, which is in contrast to the work of Lucian Freud. These two different processes have different impacts when focusing on the value of time when creating these pieces and is something I will be taking consideration when critiquing in my own work

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Mother.

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Mother.photo

This was more focused upon the colours and tones features within the face, with more pinkier flesh like qualities in the cheeks and paler greens in the lower chin and neck, whilst trying to keep the brush-stroke work impasto as viscous. I’ve also kept the painting quite life sized to helpthe suject stand out in the painting as almost like a real being

Changing the Scale

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I’ve decided upon going from 35cmx35cm paintings to enlarging my canvas to A1 size to look on how this has an effect on my use of mark making once more, but at a larger scale. I’ve originally decided on using charcoal at this stage to see how this compares to my timed drawings, and I have also spent 15 minutes on this piece, but I’ve noticed I’m more concerned son facial

15 minute Selfie, A1.

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I decided to increase scale in this portrait in order to see how mark making techniques differed to the original smaller portraits, and have used broader lines and rubbings. However, I’ve done this in charcoal as I’ve wanted to compare to my timed drawings in order to compare and contrast the 15 minute poses. Even though I am pleasedwith the result, I think I have overdone the portrait and put too much work into it instead of leaving it more suggestive